Phire Wire Network

617 notes

psych2go:


For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

66,485 notes

samandriel:

Come not between a dragon and his wrath.

Guys I’m not even gonna lie to you but I stared at this photoset and for a moment I was like “it’s weird that they only ever have animated or CGI dragons and they don’t use real ones”

(Source: thorsodinson, via pinsir)

189 notes

jovvn:

Sacred Band of Thebes
Ancient Greek elite battalion comprised of 150 pairs of homosexual male lovers. Winning every battle encountered, including engagements with the renown Spartans, up until their final defeat at the Battle of Chaeronea against Alexander The Great, and his father king Philip II. Surrounded and overwhelmed after the Theban army and its allies had broken and fled, the Sacred Band of Thebes refused to surrender.
and when, after the battle, Philip was surveying the dead, and stopped at the place where the three hundred were lying, all where they had faced the long spears of his phalanx, with their armour, and mingled one with another, he was amazed, and on learning that this was the band of lovers and beloved, burst into tears and said: ‘Perish miserably they who think that these men did or suffered aught disgraceful.’
—Plut. Pel. 18.5

jovvn:

Sacred Band of Thebes

Ancient Greek elite battalion comprised of 150 pairs of homosexual male lovers. Winning every battle encountered, including engagements with the renown Spartans, up until their final defeat at the Battle of Chaeronea against Alexander The Great, and his father king Philip II. Surrounded and overwhelmed after the Theban army and its allies had broken and fled, the Sacred Band of Thebes refused to surrender.

and when, after the battle, Philip was surveying the dead, and stopped at the place where the three hundred were lying, all where they had faced the long spears of his phalanx, with their armour, and mingled one with another, he was amazed, and on learning that this was the band of lovers and beloved, burst into tears and said: ‘Perish miserably they who think that these men did or suffered aught disgraceful.’

Plut. Pel. 18.5

(Source: aegeanart.tripod.com, via andmad)